college scholarships Archives - Sonia Shah Organization

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SSO scholarships ‘have powerful effect’ on young women

Cost of higher education shows no sign of slowing

The costs of college education in the United States continue to rise every year, above the rate of inflation and well above lagging family incomes. According to the College Board, over the past decade:

The average cost for in-district students at public two-year colleges increased 18 percent between 2006-2011, and 11 percent from 2011 to the 2016-17 school year. As of this school year, the total cost at a two-year college (including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses) averages $7,960 per year.

For in-state students at public four-year colleges and universities, costs increased 29 percent between 2006-2011, and 9 percent in the past five years. The average total cost for in-state students (with the addition of room and board) is now $24,420 per year.

The average cost of attending a private nonprofit four-year college increased 13 percent in those first six years, and 13 percent from 2011 to the 2016-17 school year. The average total cost at a private college is now $48,840 annually.

See more at     www.collegeboard.org

EXAMPLE: University of Illinois

Illinois resident:
Tuition & Fees $15,698-$20,702
Room & Board $11,308
Books & Supplies $1,200
Other Expenses $2500
Total: $30,706- $35,710

Non-Resident
Tuition & Fees $31,998-$36,992
Room & Board $11,308
Books & Supplies $1,200
Other Expenses $2,840
Total: $47,336-$52,340

Source: https://admissions.illinois.edu/Invest/tuition


By KARIN RONNOW | Sonia Shah Organization | 17 April, 2017

When Zuleyma Cordero was 19, she started college in Chicago’s western suburbs. Excited and determined, she knew a college degree was necessary for her to achieve her dreams of a business career.

“Education can have enormous personal benefits for those who acquire it, but it also has external benefits to the rest of society.” – The New York Times

Neither of her parents had gone to college. Her mom worked at a fast-food restaurant. Her dad juggled two part-time jobs at a restaurant and a retail store “so we can make ends meet,” Zuleyma said. Despite the family’s strained finances, both parents supported their daughter’s college ambitions, proud of her grit and academic success.

“Then my mom got really ill and she stopped working,” Zuleyma said. “Being the oldest of my siblings, I made the decision to stop going to school and work to help my dad out with bills at home. I did not want my younger siblings to stop their education and start working.”

Such a turn of events is all too common, especially given the soaring costs of higher education in the United States. More than half of students who leave college before graduating cite the “need to work and make money,” according to the Public Agenda organization. 

Four years later Zuleyma was still working. Her family’s financial situation had improved, but not by much. “I thought I could go back to school whenever I wanted, but it’s never as easy as it sounds, especially when we are paying off medical bills,” she said.Donate to College Scholarships for Women

Then she heard about Sonia Shah Organization’s (SSO) new scholarship program, which helps underprivileged young women in Chicago earn college degrees. She applied and was accepted into the program. Her prayers were answered.

Zuleyma, 24, is now in her second semester at Harper Community College in Palatine, Ill. Single and “with no children — yet,” she still works while studying accounting and business, but maintains a high grade-point average and hopes to finish with a double major.

If she had not received the scholarship, which covers tuition, fees and books, she said, “I would probably have had to keep working trying to save up for school.”

Equal opportunity to education

SSO’s scholarship program, like all of its endeavors, grew out of Sonia Shah’s dream of a world where all girls have the same access to education as she did.

Sonia, who died in car accident two days before beginning her freshman year at The College of William and Mary, embodied the “pay it forward” philosophy during her too-short life. In a college-application essay, she wrote: “It is only through the work of the women who came before me that I don’t live in ignorance and isolation.” Other girls deserve the same opportunities, she wrote.

SSO needs your help to fund college scholarships for Zuleyma and other needy young women. Our 2017 Scholarship Campaign goal is $10,000. All money raised will go to students.

Every dollar helps. You can make a difference.

“Given the chance, there is no limit to what these girls can do,” Sonia said. Research shows that a college degree increases a woman’s earning potential, improves her health (and her family’s), empowers her with critical-thinking skills, and increases her self-esteem. But that’s not all.

“Given the chance, there is no limit to what these girls can do,” Sonia said.

“Education can have enormous personal benefits for those who acquire it, but it also has external benefits to the rest of society,” the New York Times reported. “Workers with more education are more productive, which makes companies more profitable and the overall economy grow faster.

“But the great national crisis” is that too many “young adults are not going to college or, if they do, don’t graduate, in large part because they can’t afford it,” the Times reported. 

After a decade of double-digit price increases, the average annual cost is now $8,000 at a two-year college and $49,000 at a private four-year college.
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